An analysis of japanese tradition in the great wave off kanagawa by katsushika hokusai

It is a rather small 10 x 15 inch but very fine colour woodcut which represents a gigantic wave curling over three tiny fisher boats. On the background, one can see a small, distant, snow-capped Mount Fuji. Only two colors are used in this picture:

An analysis of japanese tradition in the great wave off kanagawa by katsushika hokusai

History[ edit ] Mount Fuji is a popular subject for Japanese art due to its cultural and religious significance. This belief can be traced to The Tale of the Bamboo Cutterwhere a goddess deposits the elixir of life on the peak.

As the historian Henry Smith [5] explains, "Thus from an early time, Mt. Fuji was seen as the source of the secret of immortality, a tradition that was at the heart of Hokusai's own obsession with the mountain.

It depicts three boats being threatened by a large wave while Mount Fuji rises in the background.

Visual literacy – Let's see what you see.

While generally assumed to be a tsunami, the wave was probably intended to simply be a large ocean wave. Each of the images was made through a process whereby an image drawn on paper was used to guide the carving of a wood block.

This block was then covered with ink and applied to paper to create the image see Woodblock printing in Japan for further details.

The complexity of Hokusai's images includes the wide range of colors he used, which required the use of a separate block for each color appearing in the image.The Great Wave off Kanagawa from Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji.

Contextual and Formal Analysis of Under The Great Wave off Kanagawa

c. Polychrome woodblock print on paper, 9 7/8” x 14 5/8” (25 x cm). Hokusai’s The Great Wave off Kanagawa is a woodblock print that was published around , and it is one of the most iconic Japanese works of art in the world. Mar 14,  · The Great Wave off Kanagawa by Katsushika Hokusai (Japanese, –) is assumed by many to be a portrayal of a Tsunami off the coast of Japan.

In reality it's not - it's another type of wave.

The Great Hokusai – Why do We Still Obsess over that Japanese Wave Painting ? | Widewalls

In reality it's not - it's another type of wave. Analysis of The Great Wave off Kanagawa by Hokusai Essay Sample The Great Wave off Kanagawa by Hokusai is a famous woodcut print that is commonly referred to as The Great Wave.

An analysis of japanese tradition in the great wave off kanagawa by katsushika hokusai

Hokusai Katsushika was one of the greatest Japanese printmakers of the 19th century. The energetic and imposing picture The Great Wave (Kanagawa Oki Nami Ura) is the best-known work by Japanese artist Hokusai Katsushika (), one of the greatest Japanese woodblock printmakers, painters and book illustrators.

The Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji prints were displayed at the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia as part of a Hokusai exhibit 21 July through 22 October , featuring two copies of The Great Wave off Kanagawa, one from the NGV and one from Japan Ukiyo-e Museum.

The Great Wave off Kanagawa (神奈川 沖 浪 裏, Kanagawa-oki nami ura, "Under a wave off Kanagawa"), also known as The Great Wave or simply The Wave, is a woodblock print by the Japanese ukiyo-e .

The Great Wave off Kanagawa - Wikipedia